Baisakhi – Greetings to all

Baisakhi – Greetings to all

Indianstampghar extends warm  wishes to  all its readers  on the auspicious occasion of  Baisakhi, Bihu & Vishu

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Baisakhi Festival

Baisakhi is one of the major festivals of Sikhs and is celebrated with lot of enthusiasm and gaiety in the state of Punjab and all throughout the world where there is a significant Sikh population. For the large farming community of Punjab, Baisakhi Festival marks the time for harvest of rabi crops and they celebrate the day by performing joyful bhangra and gidda dance. For the Sikh community, Baisakhi Festival has tremendous religious significance as it was on a Baisakhi Day in 1699, that Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Sikh Guru laid the foundation of Panth Khalsa-the Order of the Pure Ones.

Date of Baisakhi
Baisakhi Festival falls on the first day of Vaisakh month (April-May) according to Nanakshahi or Sikh Calendar. For this reason, Baisakhi is also popularly known as Vaisakhi. According to English calendar, the date of Baisakhi corresponds to April 13 every year and April 14 once in every 36 years. This difference in Baisakhi dates is due to the fact that day of Baisakhi is reckoned according to solar calendar and not the lunar calendar. The auspicious date of Baisakhi is celebrated all over India under different names and different set of rituals and celebrations. Baisakhi date coincides with ‘Rongali Bihu’ in Assam, ‘Naba Barsha’ in Bengal, Puthandu in Tamil Nadu and ‘Pooram Vishu’ in Kerala.


Baisakhi or Vaisakhi Festival is celebrated as the Sikh New Year and the founding of the Khalsa Panth. History of Baisakhi traces its origin from the Baisakhi Day celebrations of 1699 organized by the Tenth Sikh Guru, Guru Gobind Singh to form Khalsa – Brotherhood of Saint Soldiers to fight against tyranny and oppression.


Stamp on Baisakhi – Canada

Stamp on Baisakhi – Canada

Canada issued a stamp on Baisakhi.

Designed by Stacey Zabolotney, the stamp features the Khanda, a symbol which appears on the Sikh flag. The symbol derives its name from the double-edged sword (the Khanda) at the heart of the logo. The Khanda is a metaphor of divine knowledge, its sharp edges cleaving truth from falsehood.

One of the first Sikh groups to arrive in Canada came in 1897 as part of a British Army unit which passed through our nation while returning home from Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee celebrations.

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